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Pdf download is slow on steampunk bible

Pdf download is slow on steampunk bible

 




Download: Pdf download is slow on steampunk bible




Most engines are powered by steam and there are giant airships floating around everywhere. A notable early example of clockpunk would be 1939. If the other two books had been filmed it would have become clear that at least four universes were involved: Lyra's, ours, the Wheelers' one and the universe of Cittàgazze.


pdf download is slow on steampunk bible

The character is featured in the comic and in the second film, 2008 , as an a gaseous form in a partly mechanical suit. Some examples of this type include the novel , the comic book series , the Disney animated film , 's , and the. Since there is absolutely nothing wrong with redirects that's not an issue, But if a bar-link will make RJ happier we it can do that too.


pdf download is slow on steampunk bible

- The 1998 game , as well as the other sequels including its , feature heavy steampunk-inspired architecture, setting, and technology.

 

I think it is high time for the active, experienced editors to make a cull of this article. In the last two months, a great many additions have been made in the film, tv, and video game sections that probably do not pass muster. Let's make a concerted effort to discuss here which ones we think do not make the grade, and be more vigilant in seeing they do not get readded. But I fear that too many elitists have hijacked the genre and decided that Steampunk is solely 1800's based and nothing else. So you wind up with people just including any film, book, or music that they happen to like. Usually anything with even remotely retro-future aspects to it. Or anything that's remotely Victorian. According to the first paragraph of the article, Sky Captain would seem to fit the definition perfectly. My non-expert opinion would be that it is surely a steampunk film. If it's not, then I'd like this page to help clarify why that wouldn't be the case so that I can be more educated on the topic. It is not wikipedias place to designate something steampunk. The only reason it is not in the list, is that no-one has bothered to look for a reliable source for it. Putting an unsourced entry in, that you already believe is Steampunk, would not be very educational, imo. SkyCaptain is clearly post WWII era, and the technology is powered by gasoline engines and modern electrical systems, not steam. I don't understand why this distinction is so hard. Not everything Retro-Future is Steampunk. The words do not mean the same thing. Theoretically we could create a separate list for every cyberpunk derivative, but my proposal is to create a list of all retro-futuristic fiction. This list will perpetually degrade with well-meaning editors adding especially films and movies more or less at random. Although I a agree that people will always try and argue the toss over what is and isn't Steampunk one easy way to check is to look over the article in question. As I've said before here and elsewhere this article isn't where things get assigned to Steampunk, this should be done in the article. Clearly this might lead to some cobbling Steampunk onto an article but that should be obvious. If it says something is Steampunk which doesn't seem to be but it has been in a stable article for a while then it is best to flag the problem on their talk page and see how it resolves itself. So we don't have to come up with a definition and apply it here - the onus is on those adding the item to make sure the article supports this claim. The article on the proposed item isn't golden and this is derivative. Both this and the main article should have sources to back up the steampunk claim. An article's stability is completely irrelevant, it might just be an obscure article or an overlooked claim, those definitely exist. If you think something is or isn't steampunk, do a search, follow the links, etc. It's not rocket science. This show is one you definitely can't miss. It's a dark and dreaming story of a steampunk alternate future, in which battered demigods roam the streets of ancient cities and heroes--mortal, immortal, and doomed--do what terrible things they must, in the hope of life and the face of the end of everything. So any media that falls into that category would count as steampunk. Instead we'd have to go back to external sources and compare those. The definition for steampunk which they use on that page is far too vague: Possibly the easiest definition of steampunk is: Modern technology as depicted using an earlier form of technology. Typically this includes a lot of cranks, gears and clockwork mechanisms, but might also feature basic electricity gathered from hydroelectric, geothermal or other sources. With this as their definition, a great many games might be deemed appropriate with which we would disagree. I would never hold myself up as an expert on video games---quite the contrary, in fact! Seems like an unreliable source to me. I'm removing it for now but not removing the entries that use it. Wells, or Mary Shelley. I considered also making an exception for works that include or parody Tesla, Like 'The Prestige', but couldn't think of how to justify that. I don't think people will like the result. In fact, I'm not even sure I like it. I'm sure that some worthy books got the axe. But I decided to be and give it a try and see what people think. If people think this is too drastic, I won't be insulted at all if it gets reverted. Ones I'd flag as possible causes for concern is the original Dr Who series - it has been a while since I watched either and one tries not to remember Sylvester McCoy's run as the Doctor but I can't recall anything that would justify their inclusion other than a Victorian setting. The two from the new series seem OK - the first has clockwork robots and the second has a giant steam-powered Cyberman stomping through London but I can't put my finger on anything similar for the other two. Not only does the G4tv link list the game as such in the second paragraph, I have a second link here, , Scifi. I rmved it the first time, but the new cite looks fine. It looks like standard science fiction to me - there is no anachronistic steam power, there is a science fictional speculation on future technology. I added a citation tag for now, as it's removal was reverted. Can anyone provide a citation, or is it purely original research? I notice that it's article has attained GA status with no mention of Steampunk at all, so any citation found would be good to see there too. Unless the film is not in this genre at all.... Is Jules Verne steampunk, even though its anachronism is forward-looking rather than backward. Most of those interested in the community find this contradiction trite, or at least have the wit to see beyond it. Melies' film is a clear derivative of Verne, and has similar rights to inclusion in the canon. As to references, then Vogel 1974. I imagine you'll cheerfully delete away, secure in your narrow view of rote recitation of policy and ignoring how ridiculous this makes your changes look. WP is not a feel-good society for bloggers. WP is an Encyclopedia filled only with verifiable facts. If a fact is literally false, but a lot of people prefer to believe it is true, then it is still false and should not be presented as true in an encyclopedia. When I culled the list before, I left things that were modern works inspired by Jules Verne, as that view is backed up by the article itself. The man himself was still alive! Now it's a very good question whether the steampunk archetypes Verne, Wells et al are part of it, or merely influences upon it, but that's not swayed by the very simplest phrasing of a pat definition being that which excludes them. That merely means it's a poor definition, or a foolish attitude to place an over-precise interpretation on an imprecise statement. It's a good faith question though, and one worthy of many a bottle in the snug of the Engineer's Guild. In an encylopedic context such as this, the best you can hope for is to round up these pre-neeologism sources, describe them but to list them separately as proto-steampunk. As to referencing Melies, then that's easy from any history of early film this is the earliest sf film we're talking about, not anything obscure, and anyone familiar with the history of either film, sf or sf films will know it well. All you do is argue, but never improve the list with citation, which is a core part of wikipedia. I've brought a number of SF-related lists up to featured list status, and arguing at featured list review that we don't need citations will get us nowhere. I didn't say i made more eidts, i said a added more citations, which is in response to your accusations that i am only interested in deleting material and preventing others from adding examples. I'm guessing this response means there are none? I might point out, that for all your complaining, i have added more citations to , , , and than you have or ever will. My definition is immaterial, as it is reliable sources we need, not oringinal research from me or anyone. But, Voyage to the moon has no steam, it uses rocket ships to fly to the moon: It is quite clearly just science fiction of it's day. They are certainly precursors and inspirations for the genre, and should be mentioned. At least that was what it said when i added the citations there, many months ago. Maybe this list needs another section for precursors in film - the Matrix online article mentions specific authors and works, although all are based on books, so maybe a precursors section to cover all media up to the coining of the term? That how we did it in the List of cyberpunk works. Nice work on the previous cull - i started something similar in the cat. If could contain works by Verne and other works that would have been considered simply futurist sci-fi when they were made, but are retro-future by modern standards. I'm all in favor of that if we can define it better and narrow it to steampunk specifically. What I just said would apply equally well to the original Star Trek series. Perhaps that would be an acceptable compromise. It would still need to be supported by external sources, or at least the articles for the listed items, so I'm not sure how well it would work. Worth a try, though. I didn't list works by those authors that don't have a cite of their own, as this would get very long I have the Encyc of Fantasy to hand, and will add the numerous other authors it mentions as precursors, including prolific writers like Dickens , nor for remakes of films ie i don't think the latest terrible Time Machine film was Steampunk at all, even if earlier versions are. But surely MTV is a reliable enough source of reference for Doctor Steel to be included? I am not bothered one way or the other I don't like his music , but there seems to be a strange assumption that everyone who adds it is a viral marketer, even when they include a valid enough looking reference. If you can explain to me why MTV is not reliable enough then fair enough. We use the same ref at the Steampunk article - i think it was removed here cos the link somehow got broken. This makes it easier to see which are cited I've now cited more than half, so the ref tags get unwieldy , and would make the list sortable by date and author, which would show both development of the genre, and which are important authors. This would remove the setting sub-heading, which i don't think are that helpful. Could mention setting in the notes, but many i havn't read, so someone else would have to do that. Also, once the table is in place, and that remai uncited i will start to tag, then remove. This will be a particular problem for the comics I only read Xmen and Sandman and TV i don'T have one so if editors are attached to particular titles being here, citation should start being added ASAP. The other sections Magnius and I already started citing. I moved them here rather than formatting for the table, in case there are no sources. I've used one such so far. The Prestige book not film can be cited as having a Steampunk subplot - is that sufficient? Anarchism, heavy focus on individuality, etc. Incidentally, is a good source of short stories that are still heavy on the 'punk', when they manage to put on an issue, which isn't often. I don't know what good my opinion is, though. It would take a good amount of research to back it up with strong citations. And it's entirely possible that some people would disagree with me. In the present time of the series's parallel world situated on a , clothing, technology, language, and decorative design of most Obscure Cities is most obviously , , and in style, with obvious futuristic to bizarre technological twists typical of steampunk. The reference for Les Cités Obscures could be , Pulp Rack, no. I consider this difference as neglectable, as the Wikipedia definition names Wells as well as Vernes as the ancestors of the steampunk genre. However I was wondering what the opinion might be about including an RPG sub-category within this list. I know it was via that I first heard the term and I know things like , and possibly may even fit the bill. I know some of the more recent computer games incorporate aspects of steampunk. What do people think? They currently have 29 bands featured, and all of them draw from some sort of 19th Century inspiration. Not all are specifically Steampunk, but most are. The only reference to them is in the same article that The Clockwork Quartet was featured in from Bizarre Magazine. Not sure how to go about this, since I'm pretty sure they need more references. Regardless I thought it worth to point out to you members to see if you can find some way to include them in the music section. If you read the books, it is clear that Lyra's world is in an alternative universe which can be reached from ours. If the other two books had been filmed it would have become clear that at least four universes were involved: Lyra's, ours, the Wheelers' one and the universe of Cittàgazze. While Lyra's world contains many steam punk elements the others do not. On balance I think that The Golden Compass should be removed from the list. All steampunk needs to be steampunk is steam-based and other relavent tech. British comic book artist has written several steampunk works. He is credited with creating the first steampunk graphic novel, , and , his most recent work to date, coming out in 2009. Both fit into the fantasy steampunk setting. Luther Arkwright is set across different. Grandville is set in a world populated mostly by , inspired by the works of and. Since the international title wholly contains the US title, I don't see how using the International version would hurt readability. The title was stable until the recent, and unhelpful, edits of one anonymous user. The stable version should be preserved. Also preserving the stable version is a weak argument. Improvements are made to articles all the time. In any case, it's clear that the longer title really is the correct title in non-US countries. Articles are supposed to be consistent in their nationality and dialect. What I have a problem with are anonymous users who make unexplained edits, the first of which changed the title to a redlink. I had no idea the film had another title, and a simple explanation when the edit was first made could have avoided this. I still do not think that using a title that redirects is helpful. In the future, someone will click on the link, see the redirect, and decide to fix it. I can almost guarantee this will occur, because it is the sort of thing I would do in such a situation. A piped link would solve the problem. An anonymous user, who uses no edit summaries, never attempts to explain why he is making his edits, a large number of which have not been helpful, and who reverts to his preferred version even whilst there is a discussion ongoing, is edit-warring. He can very easily come here and make a case for his edits. He has chosen not to. I at least made my case here before reverting again. Furthermore, the rollback was a mistake, which I regret, and was the result of being too fast and careless in where I placed my cursor. No, I don't understand it either. If consensus after some discussion goes either way I'm happy to respect that and I'd encourage Mr No Face to join in here and get spinning , but edit-warring isn't the way. I think this is rather a minor point. The retitling, as stated above, makes no sense to me. What is the naming convention? Can we simply move the article to? The current name of the article doesn't need to be seen as the only possible name for links to it. But yes, the article ought to be renamed. It's still recognizable to US audiences. And the style of this article is already established as using the more international titles. Since there is absolutely nothing wrong with redirects that's not an issue, But if a bar-link will make RJ happier we it can do that too. Of course, if we do a bar-link now, it may someday be a redirect if they rename the article. I've changed it to a piped link. Now let's never speak of this again. I hate when people do that. But I removed a bunch of sources, that were either blogs or did not support what they were supposed to be referencing. It takes place from the 1890's to the 1920's, but contains some anachronistic and fantasy elements. I'm new at this. Nowhere in the WP article does it say so. But nothing about steam machines or interesting technology. Judging by this article, there seems to be nothing steampunk about this movie, despite the overuse of the word. And add to that the io9 review. That would be a subjective judgement there's no objective standard and clearly falls foul of. What we need instead is an indication that it has been perceived as steampunk by some credible external source. As the question is the crossover between a film and a genre, some comment from either of these directions is of relevance. The film community has generally agreed too, even though there's also a well-reported quote from the producer that he didn't intend it to be steampunk. Despite that, if one significant group can be reliably sourced to describe the film as steampunk, then it's steampunk for our purposes. I shouldn't have to point out that WP is neither , nor the non-existence of something on WP a reliable disproof of it. I would think about adding that one in here — Preceding comment added by 16:48, 20 September 2011 UTC Dude, then just add it, don't talk about it. I added it yesterday after being rather surprised it wasn't there. The quality of the movie is a little iffy gotta like the outfits though , but it's solidly steampunk style. Other sources I've looked at generally say nothing about Nausicaä and steampunk, or if they do, are blogs making other passing references. I also changed the entry for Primus questionable to Les Claypool who most definitely does embrace the aesthetic. The goth swing band is also quite popular on the US West Coast and has been headlining steampunk events in recent years. Should they be added to this category? I'm thinking some of the short films are not much different. Do we have any kind of limits on widely released a film should be in order to be included in this list? As always on WP, it's a matter of notability. The standard for notability to be included in a list is less strict than the standard for something having its own article. And I think there's real value in including short films in this list. That said, I'm not sure about Forewarned. The reference linked in the article doesn't really establish anything besides purely local notability. Book - Randall Garrett's Lord Darcy novel and short stories with 2 other novels written by Michael Kurland. First written in 1964, this series encompasses a version of the British Isles where magic works according to specific rules. Science hasn't advanced much, and the tech is either magical, or steam-powered, with revolvers being the highest form of gun. Lord Darcy is an investigator assisted by a magician, who uses forensic spells. The dates of that alternate earth correspond to the publishing dates, but as I said, technology is of the steam era. Game - City of Steam: Arkadia As you can tell from the name, this free-to-play MMORPG is pure steampunk - from enemies like clockroaches and Mechanthrope Medusas, to steam-powered motorcycle mounts. Movies - Tai-Chi Hero, Tai-Chi Zero, and a third one to be announced. If you look at the posters of the two released films, they are full of clockwork gears. Part of the plot involves a giant steam-powered railroad track-laying machine. It's referred to as steampunk by its own article and outside sources. The article even once had an own section discussing its specific steampunk elements which was removed, obviously because somebody considered the series to be too 'highbrow' and sophisticated to be something as 'pulpish' as steampunk. This whole thing is even more absurd when I see other items especially in the films section that clearly don't belong here because they're actually dieselpunk. The Golden Compass is a bit of an iffy topic. On the one hand, the era it's set in or most alludes to circa 1920s-1930s seems to be closer to dieselpunk. On the other hand, the conceptual artist on that film was himself see on that , and he made dead sure to make it look like an adaptation of his 1988 Cites obscures album that's clearly more steampunk than the film that's closer to dieselpunk. The Prestige, at first glance, may appear a similar hybrid by taking place in the steampunk era but utilizing cinematographic film noir elements more typical of dieselpunk, but the setting eventually pretty solidly makes it steampunk. Anyways, for a more in-depth discussion of strict definitions vs. Then came steampunk pretty much in the 90s to retroactively and originally tongue-in-cheek refer to a genre that had been developing without a name already since the 50s or 60s long before cyberpunk! And it was not before the early 2000s that the term dieselpunk emerged as a label for a genre definitely distinct from steampunk. Whereas steampunk began to develop roughly between the 50s-70s, dieselpunk as a nostalgic retro-futuristic genre was pretty much kickstarted in the 80s, particularly by the 1982 start of the and the release of Brazil in 1985. Steampunk references Long 19th century art and design movements, such as , , , , , , , and , whereas dieselpunk references early to mid- 20th century art and design movements, such as , , , , , , , and. People seem to keep confusing steampunk and dieselpunk just like they keep confusing floral and organic art noveau with urban, Streamline Modern-type art deco. With its German expressionism and film noir influences, dieselpunk aka decodence has always been generally darker in visuals and partly also in themes than overall steampunk, but even dieselpunk is far from being as dark, edgy, and post- apocalpytic as cyberpunk. The broadest definition of the dieselpunk genre may even include the animated Disney Afternoon series Tailspin 1990-1991 that also, while it's never outright mentioned, takes place in the late 30s while sometimes taking minor liberties with small anachronisms. As said, The Golden Compass 2007 is a special case for being pretty much a steampunk-dieselpunk hybrid for its connection to Les Cités obscures. Stargate is not clockpunk. A notable early example of clockpunk would be 1939. After this long educational rant, I should propose at least one more candidate for this steampunk list, and that's George Pal's 1960 adaptation of Wells's The Time Machine. I know the book is not steampunk because it lacks the nostalgic element at the time, it was only futurist, not retro-futurist , but the film definitely is by its nostalgic references to the Victorian age. Please take a moment to review. If necessary, add after the link to keep me from modifying it. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than using the archive tool instructions below. This message is updated dynamically through the template last update: 15 July 2018. Please take a moment to review. If necessary, add after the link to keep me from modifying it. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than using the archive tool instructions below. This message is updated dynamically through the template last update: 15 July 2018. Please take a moment to review. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit for additional information. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than using the archive tool instructions below. This message is updated dynamically through the template last update: 15 July 2018. Please take a moment to review. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit for additional information. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than using the archive tool instructions below. This message is updated dynamically through the template last update: 15 July 2018.

pdf download is slow on steampunk bible

As the question is the crossover between a film and a genre, some comment from either of these directions is of relevance. Others may prefer abstract coloring pages. I am a Steampunk which means I could be Too-Apocalyptic, Atomic Punk, Stitch Punk, Sandal Punk, Bamboo Punk, Gypsy Punk, Edwardian Punk, a dandy, a sky pirate, a mad scientist, a tinkerer in a t-shirt, a goggle-wearing Brechtian clockwork doll who also has an I-Pad with bronze and copper casing jammed into my chest which plays a non-stop mix of Rasputina, Abney Sin, and HUMANWINE through the speakers mounted onto my shoulders. Some, such as the comic serieshave their own unique times and places despite partaking heavily of the flavor of historic settings. Seems like an unreliable source to me. Plans for Wood Furniture, is a renowned resistance expert. BIBLIOGRAPHY Ashley, Mike, ed. My non-expert opinion would be that it is surely a steampunk film. The station is reminiscent of a submarine, sheathed in brass with giant cogs in the ceiling and portholes that look out onto fanciful scenes.

Tauren Wells - Hills and Valleys (Acoustic Video)